Tag Archives: Natural Building

Bending Sticks

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Bending Sticks

The work of Patrick Dougherty is generally not considered a natural building technique because its sole intent is the creation of ephemeral art and artistic inspiration. However, it serves as a powerful inspiration for new and creative ways of construction.
Dougherty’s work shows the potential of nature to express and inspire. The work also demonstrates the importance of the relationship between human and nature, both in art and in life.
Sustainable construction is not the only potential form of natural building. It also is a way of connection to a more natural part of ourselves along with stimulating our senses.

Just_Around_Summer-590 Close-Ties-590 Read the rest of this entry

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RECIPROCAL FRAME STRUCTURES IN NATURAL BUILDING

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RECIPROCAL FRAME STRUCTURES IN NATURAL BUILDING

RECIPROCAL FRAME STRUCTURES

Reciprocal frame structures are defined as a total of self-supported elements in a closed structure; a pretty comprehensive but difficult to assimilate definition without a good drawing as an example.

In the next picture is shown the simplest arrangement of a mutual structure: three bars that overlap to lean on each other and achieve a simple and elegant structural balance.

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Reciprocal structures were proposed as an ingenious solution to the problem of covering a distance, or rather a surface, using elements of limited size. Read the rest of this entry

MEETING THE JAPANESE SEAWEED SHIKKUI PLASTER

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LIME, NATURAL PLANT FIBER AND SEAWEED

shikkui2

Shikkui is unique and traditional Japanese lime and seaweed plaster made of natural and ecological components, and it has been used in Japan for more than one thousand years. It was introduced to by Korean in the 6th. The original purpose was provide a canvas for the religious paintings. Then it was developed to allow large, uninterrupted earthen walls to be finished without joints, and as an earthen plastered walls protection from the rain erosion with its advanced anti-weathering and anti-efflorescence protection.

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HOW TO MAKE A HAND MADE ROCKET STOVE?

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HOW TO MAKE A HAND MADE ROCKET STOVE?

MAKE YOUR OWN ROCKET STOVE

Nice way to make easily and fast a rocket stove in 10 STEPS! Try and DO IT YOURSELF!

supplies needed to build a rocket stove

SUPPLIES:

  • #10 CAN W/ LID – Recycle one or get one from the cannery.
  • 2 LARGE 28oz CANS – Eat lots of beans tonight 🙂
  • EXTRA CAN – You need an extra can to make the shelf.
  • INSULATION – Grab some from the attic.
  • TIN SNIPS – or anything that can cut metal!
  • HEAVY-DUTY GLOVES – So you don’t cut too many fingers off!
  • MARKER – To mark where to cut on the can.
  • WIRE HANGER – To make the handle with.
  • HIGH HEAT SPRAY PAINT – If you want to make it fancy 😉

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Natural swimming pool

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Natural swimming pool

Sustainability doesn’t means loss of comfort

Here is an example of how the use of natural solutions can be really enjoyable and despite of the hard work, the results are amazing.

The Reddit user VonBubenberg read about the benefits of new green pools, and decided to build a space so on their own in the backyard, to enjoy with his family.
That was their yard when the project began in 2011. His children and he designed the entire project and chose the materials, space and shape of the pool.

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COLORFUL EARTHSHIP IN JAMAICA: SUSTAINABILITY, PARTICIPATION AND GOOD IDEAS

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TIRES, CLAY, RECYCLED CANS AND COLOUR GLASS (BY EARTHSHIP BIOTECTURE)

jamaica bottle work overview

WORKING IN EARTHSHIP JAMAICA

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THE 10 MOST BEAUTIFUL VERNACULAR NATURAL BUILDINGS AROUND THE WORLD

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ARCHITECTURE WITHOUT ARCHITECTS

Although natural building today can be understood as a wave of rejection towards conventional architecture and its practice, as a political and social movement, we cannot forget that its use is not limited to that. And of course is nothing new. Natural building is the way animals, including humans, have always built their shelter. Non-captive animals still do it and will always do. Humans, especially the ones from the questionably called developed countries ceased to do it with the industrial revolution. Emphasizing regional and idiosyncratic criteria in historical building decisions we can say there has not only been one way, not a single proper design, not some better materials than others in natural building. Culture and traditions, available resources, climatic and geologic conditions… had led the building process in the different cultures of the world. From a cultural perspective, the existence of two main descriptive characteristics arises: the vernacular and the traditional building. Vernacular building is a really interesting concept that refers to local buildings made by non-professional users with low building qualification. Which is more what we are talking about when referring to natural building nowadays. Below we can see several types of natural constructions in different spots of the world. All of them made with local materials and based on the needs of the people who inhabit them. Also they are adapted to weather conditions in the area. Enjoy!

«Aquí tenemos también un arte, la arquitectura, nacida de un modo de mirar, porque de estas mínimas peculiaridades depende a lo mejor el arte de un pueblo, y sus costumbres, y su política, y hasta su manera de entender el cosmos»

Ortega y Gasset, 1982

1. MUDHIF BUILDING IN FLOATING ISLANDS, IRAQ (MADE OF REED) Iraq Read the rest of this entry

DARUMA NATURAL BUILDING WORKSHOP

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DARUMA NATURAL BUILDING WORKSHOP

Natural building because

we need to reduce the environmental impact: it’s impossible to build a house with no environmental impact, but it’s our responsibility to minimize and localize the damage. By choosing local and sustainable materials adapted to the climate and geographical requirements we will minimize our impact and protect the health of our local ecosystems.  

 Because we need social justice: while building your home you’re also building a different kind of social structure where people depend on themselves and each other to get their basic needs met, instead of handing over their power to governments, corporations and professionals.

 Because it helps empower ourselves: we can build a house without being a professional builder by using local unprocessed materials and techniques that relay in human labor and creativity, producing a different social dynamic.

 

The power in our ideas and collective action is capable of influencing the way our society thinks, talks and acts regarding building and resources use

MICHAEL G. SMITH

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